Boeing Chinook News from Canada

 

 

         

 

 

         
Canada Receives First of 15 CH147F Chinook Helicopters

 

 

         
Canadian CH147F Chinook helicopter 147303 sits in the Canada Reception Centre during a ceremony on 27 June 2013.

             27 June 2013: Canada received the first of fifteen CH147F Chinook helicopter when tail number 147303 arrived at Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Petawawa. Click-N-Go Here to view a larger image.

 

 

             June 27, 2013: The Honourable Kerry-Lynne D. Findlay, Q.C., Associate Minister of National Defence responsible for military procurement and the Honourable Peter MacKay, Minister of National Defence, today welcomed the delivery of the Canadian Armed Forces' first new CH147F Chinook helicopter at a ceremony at the Canada Reception Centre.

             "The delivery of the new Chinook today clearly demonstrates our Government's commitment to provide our Canadian Armed Forces with the right equipment to do the many challenging jobs we ask of them," declared Minister Findlay. "The Canadian Chinook F-model - designed especially for Canada's demanding operational and environmental requirements - will provide increased mobility and flexibility to the Royal Canadian Air Force."

             "As initial crew training progresses, these new and much-improved Chinooks will certainly enhance the ability of the Canadian Armed Forces to conduct military operations wherever we are called to do so, including the rapid response to emergencies across Canada," said Minister MacKay.

             The CH147F Chinook is an advanced, multi-mission, medium to heavy-lift helicopter. Its primary mission is the transport of equipment and personnel during both domestic and deployed operations, but it also provides a vital capability to respond to humanitarian emergencies such as fire, floods, and earthquakes. These Canadian Chinooks have been modified to meet requirements for operating in Canada, including the installation of long-range fuel tanks which allow it to fly twice as far as previous models. This dramatically increased range is particularly important for missions in Canada's vast northern regions.

             They are also equipped with a state of the art electrical system, advanced radar and laser warning systems, three defensive machine guns and a laser-based active missile counter-measure system to defeat anti-aircraft missiles. This equipment will allow the Canadian Chinooks to be employed more effectively in a wider range of threat environments, while increasing the crews' safety and chances of mission success.

             "The new CH147F represents the most modern and advanced evolution of a helicopter design that has proven itself in military operations for many years," said Lieutenant-General Yvan Blondin, Commander Royal Canadian Air Force. "Our six older D-model Chinooks saved many Canadian and allied lives in Afghanistan by reducing the exposure to deadly IEDs on the ground. These impressive new helicopters will also be a valuable addition to Canada's tactical transport capability for many years to come."

             The total estimated cost for acquisition and in-service support for the Medium-to-Heavy Lift Helicopter Project is CAN $5 billion. It consists of the CAN $2.3 billion acquisition cost and a CAN $2.7 billion 20-year in-service support program. This procurement project remains both on time and within budget since the contract was signed with Boeing in 2009. These amounts do not include personnel, operating, and maintenance costs.

             As part of the Medium-to-Heavy Lift Helicopter Program, Boeing has committed to providing Industrial and Regional Benefits equal to US $1.25 billion, which will ensure significant benefits for Canadian industry from this procurement. Boeing is currently on track to meet its commitments.

             The entire fleet of 15 Canadian CH147F Chinooks will be delivered over the course of the next year. 450 Tactical Helicopter Squadron, located at Canadian Forces Base Petawawa, Ontario, has been re-established as the home for this new fleet and is expected to employ approximately 400 military personnel by 2016.

 

 

         
27 June 2013: Canada's new CH147F Chinook medium to heavy-lift helicopter makes its way from the nation's capital, up the Ottawa valley to its new home at Canadian Forces Base Petawawa, Ontario.

             27 June 2013: Canada's new CH147F Chinook, tail number 147303, medium to heavy-lift helicopter makes its way from the nation's capital, up the Ottawa valley to its new home at Canadian Forces Base Petawawa, Ontario. Click-N-Go Here to view a larger image.

 

 

         
27 June 2013: A view from above as Canada's new CH147F Chinook, tail number 147303, medium to heavy-lift helicopter makes its way from the nation's capital, up the Ottawa valley to its new home at Canadian Forces Base Petawawa, Ontario.

             27 June 2013: A view from above as Canada's new CH147F Chinook, tail number 147303, medium to heavy-lift helicopter makes its way from the nation's capital, up the Ottawa valley to its new home at Canadian Forces Base Petawawa, Ontario. Click-N-Go Here to view a larger image.

 

 

         
27 June 2013: Canada's new CH147F Chinook, tail number 147303, rests in the hangar at the Canada Reception Centre.

             27 June 2013: Canada's new CH147F Chinook, tail number 147303, rests in the hangar at the Canada Reception Centre. Click-N-Go Here to view a larger image.

 

 

         

 

 

         
Canadian F Models Under Construction

 

 

         
24 June 2013: Medium to Heavy Lift helicopter (MHLH), Chinook CH147F, tail number 147308, is seen going through the assembly line at the Boeing factory in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States.

             24 June 2013: Medium to Heavy Lift helicopter (MHLH), Chinook CH147F, tail number 147308, is seen going through the assembly line at the Boeing factory in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States. Click-N-Go Here to view a larger image.

 

 

         
24 June 2013: Medium to Heavy Lift helicopter (MHLH), Chinook CH147F, tail number 147304, is seen going through the assembly line at the Boeing factory in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States.

             24 June 2013: Medium to Heavy Lift helicopter (MHLH), Chinook CH147F, tail number 147304, is seen going through the assembly line at the Boeing factory in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States. Click-N-Go Here to view a larger image.

 

 

         
24 June 2013: Medium to Heavy Lift helicopter (MHLH), Chinook CH147F, tail number 147309, is seen going through the assembly line at the Boeing factory in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States.

             24 June 2013: Medium to Heavy Lift helicopter (MHLH), Chinook CH147F, tail number 147309, is seen going through the assembly line at the Boeing factory in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States. Click-N-Go Here to view a larger image.

 

 

         

 

 

         
Dented Canadian Chinook Recovered

 

 

         
The recovery of Canadian CH147 Chinook helicopter 205. Click-N-Go Here to view a larger version of this image [1.9 Mb].
CAMP BASTION, Afghanistan – Canadian and U.S. forces safely recovered a downed Canadian Forces CH147 Chinook helicopter during a Tactical Recovery of Aircraft and Personnel (TRAP) mission in Kandahar province, Afghanistan, on 17 May 2011.

         
The recovery of Canadian CH147 Chinook helicopter 205. Click-N-Go Here to view a larger version of this image [2.9 Mb].
   Utilizing a trio CH-53E Super Stallion helicopters from Marine Heavy Helicopter Squadron 461, with assistance from 2nd Marine Logistics Group’s helicopter support team, the Canadian and American team was able to transport the damaged aircraft back to its home at Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan.

         
The recovery of Canadian CH147 Chinook helicopter 205. Click-N-Go Here to view a larger version of this image [2.4 Mb].
   “We showed up with two aircraft to do the lift in case one had a maintenance issue during the mission,” said Major Jade Steward-Campbell a CH-53E pilot and HMH-461’s maintenance officer. “A third CH-53 served as our tactical support aircraft, which launched out with the HST to rig
          the CH147 for pick-up, and to transport all the debris from the crash and Canadian Forces personnel back to Kandahar.”

             To ensure the mission was carried out safely, a pair of Canadian Forces attack helicopters provided close-air support during the mission, while Canadian Leopard 2 tanks provided ground security.

             “There were also Canadians who worked in conjunction with the HST,” explained Staff Sgt. Peter Montalvo, a CH-53E crew chief and weapons and tactics instructor with HMH-461. “They had the manuals for the Chinook and were the subject matter experts. We took our cue from them and working together we were able to bring the aircraft back to Kandahar.”

             Prior to launching the mission, the HMH-461 planners had a number of factors to consider.

             “Our maintenance section had to strip over two tons of unnecessary parts off the CH-53s in order to enable them to execute this lift,” Steward-Campbell, a Carson City, Nevada, native said. “Almost everything, with the exception of the engines and rotor blades, had to be removed from the aircraft with only eight hours notice.”

             Decreasing the weight of the aircraft was not the only factor taken into consideration before the mission.

             “The zone was extremely challenging for us, mostly due to the dust,” Steward-Campbell said. “We had reduced the weight of the aircraft, so it had sufficient power, but the dust made it difficult to find reference over the ground, but it’s the mission we train for and we accomplished it.”

             This mission marks the second time the Marine Corps Air Station New River, North Carolina, based squadron has been called upon to perform a tactical aircraft recovery during their current deployment to Afghanistan.

             “We are the premier TRAP and heavy-lift asset in-theater,” said Montalvo, a Eureka, California, native. ”I think this mission went very well. We had multiple agencies and multiple countries working together. We went in with an international effort and got the job done.”

Click-N-Go on the photographs above to view larger versions.

 

 

         

 

 

         
Canada's Chinook helicopters to be Sold

as Afghan mission ends

 

 

         
A Canadian Chinook helicopter is pictured on 10 September 2009 in Afghanistan. Canadian National Defence has put 'For Sale' signs on the air force's Chinook helicopters in Afghanistan - two years after taxpayers shelled out $282 million to buy them.

             A Canadian Chinook helicopter is pictured on 10 September 2009 in Afghanistan. Canadian National Defence has put 'For Sale' signs on the air force's Chinook helicopters in Afghanistan - two years after taxpayers shelled out $282 million to buy them.

 

 

             1 February 2011, OTTAWA — National Defence has put 'For Sale' signs on the air force's Chinook helicopters in Afghanistan -- two years after taxpayers shelled out $282 million to buy them.

             The department recently sounded out allies in the war-torn country to see whether any are interested in the heavy battlefield transports, purchased second-hand from the U.S. Army.

             Some defence analysts suggest Canada might be better served by bringing the choppers home for domestic operations, perhaps improving the search-and-rescue system.

             So far there have been no takers for the five CH147D choppers, which were rushed into Afghanistan after the Manley commission made it a condition of Ottawa continuing the war until 2011.

             Canada initially purchased six aircraft in a government-to-government arrangement with Washington, but one was shot down by Taliban small-arms fire in Panjwaii district, west of Kandahar city, last August [see the article below].

             To make up for the loss, Ottawa leased a D model American Chinook (tail number unknown - if you know, please let us know) for the reminder of the mission. Defence officials refused to say at what cost.

             If no buyers are found for the Canadian Chinooks they will be packed up and brought home when the combat mission ends in July, said the general who leads the transition headquarters.

             "We're still looking to divest ourselves of them," Brig.-Gen. Charles Lamarre said in a recent interview with The Canadian Press.

             "They're going to have to push that through and get them sold before we shut things down. If by chance we don't, we'll still have a responsibility to look after that equipment."

             The air force picked up the Afghanistan choppers intending to sell them once the combat mission ended. The decision was made, in part, because there was a new fleet of helicopters on order.

             The Conservative government signalled its intention to spend $4.7 billion on 15 new Chinooks a few years ago. The new choppers are latest model -- the F series -- and have been modified with extra-large fuel tanks and improved sensors.

             But Rob Huebert of the Centre for Strategic Studies at the University of Calgary said the older Chinooks could serve a vital role in Canada.

             They could free some of the newer helicopters for operations in the Arctic, or even bolster the country's hard-pressed search-and-rescue fleet, he said.

             "I don't think having too many helicopters is a bad thing," Huebert said. "The type of capability and the type of lift the Chinooks provide can always be put to use here."

             Having the surplus Chinooks around would give the military the opportunity during the summer to station one or two of the newer long-range helicopters in the North, where the Harper government has said it wants a more robust presence.

             The air force has long had availability and spare parts woes with its CH-149 Cormorant search-and-rescue helicopters, and operations of that aircraft have been restricted to the East and West Coasts.

             Huebert said the extra Chinooks could slide into search-and-rescue operations in Central Canada, where the smaller Griffon helicopter has been covering the gap.

             The cost of maintaining and operating the older Chinooks might be slightly higher, he said, but likely not prohibitive to the extent that other fleets would have to be shut down.

             The air force has said it would be expensive to keep the D model aircraft.

             The Defence Department was asked for comment, but refused to discuss the rationale for ditching the helicopters.

          [Editor's Note: Some estimates have placed the hourly operating cost of the US Army CH-47 Chinook helicopter at over USD 3,000.]

 

 

         

 

 

          Canadian Chinook Shot Down

 

 

         
Canadian soldiers gather near a burning Canadian Forces CH147 Chinook helicopter after it made a hard landing close to the village of Bazaar e Panjway, in the Panjway district west of Kandahar on 5 August 2010.

             Canadian soldiers gather near a burning Canadian Forces CH147 Chinook helicopter after it made a hard landing close to the village of Bazaar e Panjway, in the Panjway district west of Kandahar on 5 August 2010.

 

 

             5 August 2010, KANDAHAR, Afghanistan — Eight soldiers suffered minor injuries Thursday after a Canadian Chinook helicopter, tail number unknown, was struck by small arms fire and forced to make a hard landing. The aircraft burst into flames and was destroyed.

             There were five crew members and 16 passengers on board the CH147 Chinook helicopter that came down hard at 2 p.m. local time near Bazaar e Panjway, about 20 kilometres west of Kandahar City — Afghanistan's second-largest city. The five crew members included two pilots and three door gunners.

             The helicopter was formerly a CH-47D operated by the U.S. Army and purchased by the Canada for use in the Canadian Forces to supplement their operations in the Middle Eastern Theater.

          [Editor's Note: If you know the tail numbers involved, we would sure like to know. Please email us.]

 

 

          Related Information

 

          Canadian C Models

          Operation Iraqi Liberation

 

 

          The CH-47 - 40 years old and still circling the world.

         

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