Alaska Chinook News

 

 

          B Company - "Sugar Bears North" unit patch.
242 ASHC / B Company - "Sugar Bears North" D model fielding poster.
B Company - "Sugar Bears North" High Altitude Rescue Team (HART) patch.

 

 

         
SFC Rob Stephens poses on the ramp of a Sugar Bear aircraft while deployed to Afghanistan in 2011. The load of chickens is interesting to say the least...

             SFC Rob Stephens, Flight Engineer, poses on the ramp of a Sugar Bear aircraft while deployed to Afghanistan in 2011. The load of chickens is interesting to say the least...

 

 

          B Company, 1st Battalion, 52nd Aviation Regiment

 

 

         
Alaska, 7 July 2010: A CH-47 Chinook helicopter from Fort Wainwright's B Company, 1st Battalion, 52nd Aviation Regiment, flies along Mount McKinley on a mission. The unit recently transported a climber from the base camp at 14,000 feet when he began acting in a strange manner.

             Alaska, 7 July 2010: A CH-47D Chinook helicopter from Fort Wainwright's B Company, 1st Battalion, 52nd Aviation Regiment, flies along Mount McKinley on a mission. The unit recently transported a climber from the base camp at 14,000 feet when he began acting in a strange manner. Click-N-Go Here to view a larger image.

 

 

             FORT WAINWRIGHT, Alaska -- Soldiers from Fort Wainwright's B Company, 1st Battalion, 52nd Aviation Regiment, 16th Combat Aviation Brigade, evacuated a Pennsylvania man from Mount McKinley after reports that he was acting mentally unstable.

 

             Although Denali National Park has the use of a helicopter during the climbing season, the Army was asked to assist because the man was considered a potential threat to a pilot in the park's small high-altitude helicopter. The 25-year-old climber was strapped to a backboard for transport in an Army Chinook CH-47D helicopter, tail number unknown.

 

             The Soldiers of the B Company's High Altitude Rescue Team have made several rescues from North America's highest mountain over the years, including one at 19,600 feet and a rescue hoist at 18,200. The National Park Service calls on the Army when its helicopter is out of service, there are more patients than their small aircraft can carry at one time or for other reasons the park service helicopter cannot do the mission.

 

             The unit has also assisted park rangers by transporting supplies for the base camps at the beginning and end of the climbing season, giving the pilots and crews some necessary training for the missions when they are called to the mountain.

 

             Upon arrival at Fort Wainwright the man was transported by the Alaska State Troopers to Fairbanks Memorial Hospital.

 

 

         

 

 

          Bravo Company

4th Battalion, 123rd Aviation Regiment
         
"Sugar Bears North"

 

 

          A Crash in Iraq

 

 

             Saturday, 22 May 2005: Five Fort Wainwright Soldiers were injured when their helicopter crashed in Iraq. The CH-47D Chinook cargo helicopter, tail number 87-00102, lost power and the pilot was forced to make an emergency landing. Army officials are being pretty tight lipped about what exactly happened, and haven't released the names of injured troops. But we do know that five Fort Wainwright Soldiers were hurt, after the chopper had to make an emergency landing.

             "Two of the crew members were treated and released, one is in the hospital overnight for observation, two others were evacuated to Germany for further treatment. None of them suffered life threatening injuries, says Linda Douglass, a public affairs officer at Fort Wainwright.

             The Soldiers were part of the B Company - "Sugar Bears North", 4th Battalion, and 123rd Aviation Regiment and have been serving in the Middle East since last December. That unit is made up 500 soldiers from Alaska - primarily pilots, and mechanics. There were five Soldiers on board when the helicopter was forced to land after both engines lost power and now has significant damage. "Damage to the aircraft is significant and but again, we are just pleased that the pilot was able to bring the helicopter down with no fatalities, says Douglass.

             All five of the injured Soldiers have spoken with their families, who were immediately notified about the crash. Fort Wainwright officials say families are always very relieved to hear from there loved ones whenever anything like this happens in war.

 

 

         

 

          90-00183

 

         

 

 

         
Alaska, 18 June 2004: Soldiers aboard a CH-47D Chinook helicopter (tail number unknown) depart Fort Wainwright and approach a landing zone on Eielson Air Force Base during exercise Northern Edge in Alaska. The Soldiers are assigned to B Company - "Sugar Bears", 4th Battalion, 123rd Aviation Regiment. The joint exercise is designed to enhance interoperability among the military services.

 

             Alaska, 18 June 2004: Soldiers aboard a CH-47D Chinook helicopter (tail number unknown) depart Fort Wainwright and approach a landing zone on Eielson Air Force Base during exercise Northern Edge in Alaska. The Soldiers are assigned to B Company - "Sugar Bears", 4th Battalion, 123rd Aviation Regiment. The joint exercise is designed to enhance interoperability among the military services. Click-N-Go Here to view a larger image.

 

         

 

         
Landing a Chinook on a Ship - DLQs

 

         

 

         
89-00172 experiences a fire light illumination at Fort Wainwright, Alaska.

 

             89-00172, piloted by CW3 Jeff Wagner and Major Kenneth Manning, experiences a "Fire Light" illumination on the number one engine for the second day in a row. Concerned, he declared an emergency to the tower at Wainwright Army Airfield and upon landing was chased down the runway by crash rescue vehicles. As it turned out there was no fire - the fire detection element surrounding the engine was chaffed against the airframe causing the light to come on.

 

         

 

         
Ichthyosaur fossil extraction in the Arctic Circle of Alaska.

 

          Saving an Ichthyosaur

 

         

 

          Former Commanders

 

         

 

          Rescue on the Colville River

 

         

 

         
Command Sergeant Major (CSM) Carlos Pagan jumps from a CH-47D Chinook helicopter for an air assault on the fictional town of Simpsonville in the Yukon Training Area west of Fort Greely, Alaska, during Exercise Northern Edge 98, on 20 February 1998. More than 90,000 Soldiers, Sailors, Marines, Airmen, Coast Guardsmen and National Guardsmen are participating the exercise. Northern Edge 98 is designed to practice joint operational techniques and procedures, increasing interoperability between the services. Pagan is the Command Sergeant Major for the 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Division (L), Fort Greely, Alaska.

 

             Command Sergeant Major (CSM) Carlos Pagan jumps from a CH-47D Chinook helicopter for an air assault on the fictional town of Simpsonville in the Yukon Training Area west of Fort Greely, Alaska, during Exercise Northern Edge 98, on 20 February 1998. More than 90,000 Soldiers, Sailors, Marines, Airmen, Coast Guardsmen and National Guardsmen are participating the exercise. Northern Edge 98 is designed to practice joint operational techniques and procedures, increasing interoperability between the services. Pagan is the Command Sergeant Major for the 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Division (L), Fort Greely, Alaska.

 

 

          Glacier Landings

 

 

         
An aft gear landing on the Ruth Glacier, Mt. McKinley (Denali), Alaska.

 

             An aft gear landing on the Ruth Glacier, Mt. McKinley (Denali), Alaska. The unknown tail number was piloted by CW3 Shawn Norton and CW3 Jeff Huber. The landing was called by SFC Rafael Ocasio Jr., assisted by SSG Clayton Sauer and SSG Keith Johnson. Date unknown. Click-N-Go Here to view a larger version of this image.

 

 

          Related Sites

 

          "Sugar Bears North" Unit History

 

 

          The CH-47 - 40 years old and still circling the world.

         

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